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EricaO

EricaO

Currently reading

Frackistan: The Promise and Peril of America’s Energy Revolution
Russell Gold
Savaging the Dark
Christopher Conlon
The End-of-Life Handbook: A Compassionate Guide to Connecting with and Caring for a Dying Loved One
David B. Feldman, S. Andrew Lasher, Ira Byock
Final Journeys: A Practical Guide for Bringing Care and Comfort at the End of Life
Maggie Callanan
A Better Way of Dying: How to Make the Best Choices at the End of Life
Jeanne Fitzpatrick, Eileen M. Fitzpatrick, William H. Colby, William Colby
Handbook for Mortals: Guidance for People Facing Serious Illness
Joanne Lynn, Janice Lynn Schuster, Joan Harrold
Change Anything: The New Science of Personal Success
Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, David Maxfield, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler
S.
Doug Dorst, J.J. Abrams
Dances in Two Worlds: A Writer-Artist's Backstory
Thordis Simonsen
Tigers in Red Weather
Liza Klaussmann, Katherine Kellgren

The Gentle Art of Preserving: Pickling, Smoking, Freezing, Drying, Curing, Fermenting, Bottling, Canning, and Making Jams, Jellies and Cordials

The Gentle Art of Preserving: Pickling, Smoking, Freezing, Drying, Curing, Fermenting, Bottling, Canning, and Making Jams, Jellies and Cordials - Katie Caldesi, Giancarlo Caldesi I haven't actually read this. I've only flipped through it, examined some pages, drooled over some photos. However, after seeing both a recipe for elderflower cordial (my mom has elderberry bushes and they don't get used for anything!) AND pictures of dried chives on things (ok, see, I have this thing with dried chives. I make chive-blossom vinegar - this recipe: http://www.stonegableblog.com/chive-blossom-vinegar-tutorial/ - in the early summer but always wind up with leftover chive blossoms. So I dry them. Then I use them in the winter and they're so pretty and have such a lovely, subtle flavor but then people who get the food with the dried chive blossoms are all, "What ARE these?" and I say, "They're dried chive blossoms" and the people scrape them aside thinking that flowers are inedible and I launch into my, "Oh! You can EAT those! I have lots of dried, edible flowers..." and you know what? In the end, it makes me sad that no one else appreciates my beautiful and mild-tasting seasoning. Except, obviously, these people do because they put chive flowers on food!), I felt I had to purchase this book.

If a book can make me purchase it unread, I'm going to give it five stars. That will make me feel better about myself and my spending.
Alas, the book will arrive too late for the things I want to make but I figure, we're not really canning this year with Mom so I'll have lots of extra jars. May as well put them and the garden to use, right? It will be fun to have new things to make. New, non-yucky things (pickled beets = SO gross)